Tag: intentionality

  • Husserl’s Disciples: Dietrich von Hildebrand’s critique of relativism

    Husserl’s Disciples: Dietrich von Hildebrand’s critique of relativism

    In a previous post, I contrasted moral relativism with the value ethics of Dietrich von Hildebrand, a student of Edmund Husserl. In this post, I wish to consider von Hildebrand’s critique of relativism. As before, I encourage all my readers to turn to the phenomena themselves in order to either verify or invalidate von Hildebrand’s…

  • The structure of the “noema”

    The structure of the “noema”

    In several previous posts (here and here), I have described two interpretations of Husserl’s crucial concept of the “noema,” offering problems with both interpretations. Some scholars maintain that when Husserl speaks of the noema, he is referring to a mental entity that is roughly equivalent to Frege’s “sense.” Others argue that by “noema” Husserl simply…

  • Husserl’s Disciples: Dietrich Von Hildebrand on Value

    Husserl’s Disciples: Dietrich Von Hildebrand on Value

    The questions surrounding value, such as its nature and its relation to morality, have been asked and answered by philosophers in various ways throughout philosophical history. In particular, the issue of whether value is “objective” or “subjective” has caused much controversy in the last few centuries. Essentially, it comes down to this: is value a…

  • How to be a Philosopher

    How to be a Philosopher

    What does it mean to be a philosopher? How does one philosophize? Throughout history, numerous answers to these questions have been given. For Plato, to do philosophy is to behold the Forms. For Marcus Aurelius, to be a philosopher is to act virtuously and embrace calm indifference in the face of circumstance. For Descartes, philosophy…

  • The Himalayas and the Lifeworld: a personal experience

    The Himalayas and the Lifeworld: a personal experience

    For Edmund Husserl, doing philosophy is not an abstract academic exercise. It is not an activity that only occurs in lecture rooms and behind desks. On the contrary, to do philosophy is to return to lived experience in order to describe exactly what is found therein. Thus, it is preeminently concrete and even personal. Of…

  • Transcendental Idealism: the guardian of natural realism

    Transcendental Idealism: the guardian of natural realism

    In a previous post, I argued that Edmund Husserl does not hold to any form of traditional idealism. On the contrary, I suggested that Husserl’s position is in some ways closer to epistemological realism. So, this naturally raises the question: If Husserl subscribes to some kind of realism, why then does he explicitly and persistently…

  • Book Review: Introduction to Phenomenology

    Book Review: Introduction to Phenomenology

    Robert Sokolowski’s Introduction to Phenomenology was one of the first books on Husserlian Phenomenology that I read, after I was introduced to Husserl several years ago. At the time, although I had been studying philosophy for quite a while, I was unfamiliar with Husserl’s terminology and principles. After all, as anyone who has read his…

  • Is Husserl a Traditional Idealist?

    Is Husserl a Traditional Idealist?

    In my last post, I gave a brief introduction the realism vs. idealism debate. In this post, I wish to give a preliminary answer to the question: is Husserl a realist or an idealist? As I mentioned previously, some of Husserl’s students and contemporaries took him to be an “idealist” in the traditional sense of…

  • Immanence and Transcendence: consciousness and world

    Immanence and Transcendence: consciousness and world

    In my last post, I examined Husserl’s understanding of the phenomenological reduction. I ended by stating that for Husserl, the reduction is the “bracketing” or “disconnecting” of all transcendent objectivities. In this post, then, I will discuss what transcendence and immanence mean in Husserlian phenomenology. For Husserl, “immanence” refers to that which is really contained…

  • The Phenomenological Reduction: rising above the world

    The Phenomenological Reduction: rising above the world

    Over my last few posts, I have outlined various aspects of Husserlian phenomenology, including the descriptive method, the meaning of essences, and the natural attitude. In this post, I will describe Husserl’s conception of the phenomenological reduction. As I have explained previously, Husserl argues that we cannot philosophize within the natural attitude without serious problems,…